Ethical Journalism Newsletter: November 14th, 2014

 

Ethical Journalism News

Building Trust and Tolerance: Seminar on Journalism and Hate Speech

Final Statement

From November 12-14, 2014, the Building Trust and Tolerance: Seminar on Journalism and Hate Speech seminar was held in Beirut. It was organised by the Maharat Foundation, the Ethical Journalism Network and the Norwegian Institute of Journalism. Below is the final statement from the event and details further action to combat hate speech.

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The Ethics of Undercover Journalism: Where the Police and Journalists Divide

Journalism in the public interest can be a dodgy business. Sometimes, when all else fails, to get their story reporters may have to use undercover techniques. They may even have to break the law. This week, on both sides of the Atlantic, two stories about the controversial use of subterfuge illustrate the thorny ethical issues at stake for journalists.

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More Potential Victims Of ‘Fake Sheikh’ Come Forward After BBC Documentary

Fake Sheikh: Exposed was finally shown on BBC One on Wednesday night after being delayed by legal wrangling over the documentary’s allegations of corrupt practices by the investigative journalist. Mark Lewis, the lawyer who represented scores of celebrities in phone-hacking claims, told Panorama he was representing eight potential victims of Mahmood. Lewis told the Guardian on Thursday he had been contacted by three more potential victims of Mahmood since the show was aired. (via The Guardian)

A Response to President Xi Jinping

The Chinese government has regularly declined to process visas for any new resident Times journalist and has sought to block access to the newspaper’s English-language and Chinese-language websites for people inside China over the past two years. Despite the pressures, The Times makes clear it has no intention of altering its coverage to meet the demands of any government. (via The New York Times)

Making Obama’s Case; Whose Job Is It?

The answer to the question in the headline is that it is up to the president to make his case to the American people with respect to why he and/or members of his party should be elected or re-elected. It is not up to journalists to make the case for them. Commentators can comment on whatever they want and analysts can analyze. But reporters should report, as accurately as possible, the facts and issues surrounding political campaigns. (via PBS)

Resources

Building Trust In the New World Of Information

The following presentation highlights ethical journalism issues for debate across the Middle East. The presentation was given by the EJN Director Aidan White during the Building Trust and Tolerance: Seminar on Journalism and Hate Speech held in Beirut.

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Events

EJN Members Meeting

London, UK

December 4th: EJN supporters are invited to our meeting where we will discuss our programmes for 2015 and the launch of the network as a formal charity registered in the UK. There will also be a discussion on how we follow up the recent international reports on self-regulation and media corruption.

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