Ethical Journalism Newsletter: April 3, 2015

 

Ethical Journalism News And Debates

How media companies are structured and funded and why it matters

When GigaOm unexpectedly announced they were shuttering in March, it sent shocks through the media and tech communities and raised important questions about the funding structures behind media companies. (via Mediashift)

The Germanwings crash was a tragedy for our school. Then the press descended

These ruthless journalists argue they were just doing their job – a face-saver we hear so often these days. But the public service broadcasters are often proof that it doesn’t have to be done this way: no speculation, no hunt for relatives, no interviews for money – and yet the same information. (via The Guardian)

Six Syrian cartoonists who dare to mock Assad

Poking fun of dictators is considered one of the greatest taboos, which curtail freedom of expression and endanger the lives of cartoonists anywhere, anytime. Syrian cartoonists are not an exception and have suffered torture, attacks from regime loyalists and even death for daring to speak up. (via Global Voices)

Rusbridger: ‘Fractured’ press must remember ‘sacred oath’ to protect sources

Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger has called on the UK’s “fractured press” to defend its “sacred oath” to protect sources. And he warned that journalists can’t complain about police secretly viewing journalists’ call records and yet “shrug their shoulders” at the state surveillance capabilities revealed by Edward Snowden. (via Press Gazette)

Journalists fight for open government in the face of secrecy

Transparency is inconvenient. It’s inconvenient for the reporter who’s trying to report the news and it’s inconvenient for the government that attempts to hide information. Here are some tips on how to get your FOIA requests heard by the government. (via Mediashift)