Ethical Journalism Network Newsletter – 7 July 2016

NEWS

SWATHI’S MURDER AND MEDIA: WE MUST NOT CONFUSE PUBLIC INTEREST WITH WHAT INTERESTS THE PUBLIC

Almost every list of principles or guidelines on ethical journalism mentions the importance of respecting privacy and human dignity, minimising harm, and being sensitive to the needs and interests of the community/society/public. Among the five core principles of journalism promoted by the Ethical Journalism Network is humanity: “Journalists should do no harm. What we publish or broadcast may be hurtful, but we should be aware of the impact of our words and images on the lives of others.” The discipline of verification, which includes fact-checking, are also essential aspects of responsible journalism.

Read the full article here. (The News Minute)

BREXIT AND THE MEDIA: A FAIR FIGHT?

Following the recent referendum on whether or not the United Kingdom should remain part of the European Union, Founding Director of the LSE Media Policy Project, Damian Tambini, reflects on the role of new and traditional media in the Brexit debate.

Read the full article here. (LSE Media Blog)

After Brexit, Media to Say No to Racism and Xenophobia (Media Diversity Institute)

MEDIA PLAYS DANGEROUS GAME IN MARGINALIZING LIBERTARIAN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE

The mainstream media and polling organizations continue to promote the false narrative that Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are the only two candidates for American voters in the 2016 presidential election. Four polls were released yesterday, June 30, 2016, on the presidential election and they only included Clinton and Trump. This is dangerous because Gary Johnson will be on ballot in all 50 states and is polling between 9 to 12 percent nationally, and this is during a time that a majority of Americans do not know who he is. The mainstream media does this at their own peril as Americans are waking up to the fact that they are often not told the real story by traditional news outlets. American voters are now doing their own research and are seeking out alternative news venues to get a better picture of what is happening around them.

Read the article, which quotes the Ethical Journalism Network, here. (Examiner)

CHILCOT REPORT: JOURNALISTS AND NEWSPAPER PROPRIETORS MUST ALSO REFLECT ON THE PART THEY PLAYED IN THE MARCH TO WAR

The national press will no doubt give Tony Blair and other former members of his Government a well deserved drubbing for the criticism of them which has emerged in the Chilcot report.

Read the full article here. (Press Gazette)

Iraq: Chilcot’s lesson for reporting war

It is often said the Britain has no history of fascism or communism because its people mistrust big, abstract, political concepts. That may be so. If it is, this was a huge exception. For this invasion was a big lie based on big ideas: that liberal capitalist democracy would inevitably prevail, and quickly, once the tyrant was done down. […] Correspondents covering the invasion and occupation produced some excellent work which explained what was happening. Journalism as a whole did less well: failing to question sufficiently the reasons — especially weapons of mass destruction — which were given for starting the war. More rigorous questioning might have exposed the fact that these claims were baseless.

Read the full article here. (Reporting Conflict)

JOURNALISM OR PROPAGANDA? SBS UNDER SCRUTINY OVER ITS WALTZ WITH BASHAR

When does journalism become propaganda? That was the question being asked in the SBS newsroom last week when the network scored an exclusive interview with the Syrian president, Bashar al-Assad. Airing on Friday, the night before the election, reporter Luke Waters’ interview was hard won. He spent two years pursuing what he now describes as a “bizarre experience”.

Read the full article here. (Guardian)

CORPORATE MEDIA FAIL TO HOLD TRUMP’S FEET TO FIRE ON ONGOING BIGOTRY ONCE AGAIN

On Saturday, Donald Trump tweeted an image of a red Star of David next to a picture of Hillary Clinton with hundred dollar bills in the background, with the caption “Most Corrupt Candidate Ever” superimposed on the Star of David. A few hours later, amid strong condemnation from social media respondents, Trump deleted the image and reposted the same image except with a circle replacing the original Star of David. Unequivocally, the message is that Clinton is in the pocket of rich Jews, a stereotypical image that was harnessed by Hitler himself to build a “justification” for sending millions of Jews to their slaughter. So where was the media in covering the story? Unfortunately, the great corporate watchdog has sanitized the story, having failed to learn from history.

Read the full article here. (truth-out.org)

For the fourth straight day, Trump faces criticism on Star of David tweet (Washington Post)

PRESS COUNCIL OF INDIA TO PUBLISH GUIDELINES FOR DISTURBED AREAS BY SEPTEMBER

A 3-member visiting sub-committee of Press Council of India (PCI) announced on Tuesday that media houses operating in disturbed areas like Manipur will be provided special guidelines by September this year to protect the freedom of press.

Read the full article here. (North East Today)

WHY JOURNALISTS NEED TO REPORT ON HOW THEY WORK

Sandhya Kambhampati began her journalism career as a data reporter. Because she and her team often tackled complex projects, they soon learned to take thorough notes in case they had to explain their work to new employees. But there was a problem. Even though her team left notes, it was difficult for newcomers to decipher the shorthand speak, acronyms and insider-y references made by the team’s more seasoned members. This bothered her. She tried to make sure her teams understood more than enough to continue on after she left, but it wasn’t always easy for new hires to learn on the job. Other journalists, like her friends at the annual conference hosted by the National Institute for Computer-Assisted Reporting, were wrestling with the same problem.

Read the full article here. (Poynter)

ANALYSIS: BURMA’S MILITARY REMAINS INTOLERANT OF PRESS FREEDOM

Burma’s powerful military remains intolerant of press freedom, fearing a negative portrayal of its institution.

Read the full article here. (The Irrawaddy)

VIOLENT ATTACK TO PRESS FREEDOM IN ARGENTINA

The cooperative weekly newspaper Tiempo Argentino, was attacked in the early hours of Monday. July 4. Links between the paper’s previous owners and the Argentine secret services paint a dark picture, Open Democracy reported. The Buenos Aires Herald described the attack as more than an attack on the press, while the Committee to Protect Journalists called for the incident to be investigated. The attacks comes as the death toll for Latin American journalists reached 24 in the first six months of 2016, according to the Knight Centre.

For more on ownership and trust in journalism read the EJN’s Trust Factor report.

ACTIVITIES

SECOND EUROPEAN MEDIA AND INFORMATION LITERACY FORUM – LATVIA, 27-28 JUNE 2016

The Ethical Journalism Network participated in the Second European Media and Information Literacy Forum in Riga, Latvia on 28 June 2016. You can watch the presentation given by the EJN’s Director, Aidan White, here as well as watch his talk at an earlier event in Brussels here.