Ethical Journalism Newsletter: September 30th, 2014

 

Ethical Journalism News

Ireland’s NUJ Chief Calls for Commission of Inquiry into Media

The Irish secretary of the National Union of Journalists, Seamus Dooley, has called for the establishment of a commission of inquiry into the future of Ireland’s media. He said the commission should examine all aspects of the country’s media policy, including ownership, commercial and editorial control, employment standards, training as well as cross-ownership. (via The Guardian)

The Relationship Between Journalists and Their Sources

The intrinsic values in journalism are universal and they have survived the disruptions brought about by technology. My constant interactions with young journalists and journalism students vindicate that these values are not only central to the new generation but they try to apply them in multiple platforms on which they share their stories. (via The Hindu)

On The Uncomfortable Matter Of Beheadings And Executions

Differences in recent weeks over whether to post videos or photographs of the grisly beheadings by ISIS seem to have come down pretty strongly on the side against the postings. But what about the use of the word “beheading” itself in radio stories? Should there be an advance warning for listeners? And in a related matter, does it confer too much legal dignity on ISIS to say that the victims were “executed,” as if by a legitimate state? (via NPR)

The Guardian Readers’ Editor on… the Naming of Isis

With Britain launching air strikes against Islamic militants to stem their barbarous sweep across vast areas of Iraq, perhaps it is time to ask, as some readers have, why this newspaper continues to call these killers Isis, when media and politicians describe them variously as Isil, Islamic State or even Daesh. Are any of these terms correct? And there’s another question. Are western media playing into the terrorists’ hands by slavishly repeating their aggrandising self-descriptions and perhaps therefore aiding an increasingly sophisticated propaganda machine? (via The Guardian)

Next Time You Interview an Iranian President…

I think reporters such as Fareed Zakaria and Charlie Rose should stop pressing the Iranian presidents on human rights issues, if they are looking for remotely convincing answers. The repetitive questioning of the Iranian presidents about imprisoned or killed reporters, intellectuals, and political activists have always been met with the unwavering response that the authorities are simply enforcing the “laws” of the country, and that the judiciary is “independent.” Neither of these answers are quite true or convincing. (via the Huffington Post)

Brooks Newmark Sting Wholly in Public Interest, says Sunday Mirror Editor

The editor of the Sunday Mirror has stoutly defended her newspaper’s publication of the sex sting scandal that prompted Tory minister Brooks Newmark to resign, describing it as “wholly in the public interest”. In making the decision the Sun’s news editors are understood to have contacted Stig Abell, the former director of the Press Complaints Commission who is now managing editor of the Sun. (via The Guardian)

‘Boobs on Ground’ Joke was ‘Inappropriate,’ Fox News’ Eric Bolling Admits Bad Judgment

Fox News’ co-host Eric Bolling referred to a female pilot fighting against terrorist group ISIS as “boobs on the ground.” He has since twice apologized for his “inappropriate” joke. The comment was made during a Sept. 24 segment for Fox News show The Five about Major Mariam al Mansouri, the United Arab Emirates’ first female pilot who dropped bombs in Syria. (via iMediaEthics)

Events

6th Bali Media Forum

The Thomson Foundation , in partnership with the Indonesian Press Council and the Institute for Peace and Democracy , will hold the 6th Bali Media Forum Open Goals: Ethics in the information game in Nusa Dua, Bali from 8 to 10 October.

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