Ethical Journalism Newsletter: October 10th, 2014

 

Ethical Journalism News

Asia Launch for Global Debate on Ethics and the Internet

More than 90 journalists and media leaders from 25 countries in Asia have backed an EJN call for a new global debate on transforming the open information landscape by promoting self-regulating standards based upon key ethical principles of journalism.

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6th Bali Media Forum Launches New Vision For Ethics Online

The 6th Bali Media Forum concluded today with the adoption of common principles and a programme of work in support of promoting ethical journalism and key standards in internet communications intended for public consumption. Some 90 editors, journalists, press council representatives, internet service providers and broadcast regulators from 25 countries attended the Forum “Open Goals: Ethics in the Information Game”. (via Thomson Foundation)

President Obama Slams The Press: ‘All It Does Is Feed Cynicism’

President Obama took another stab at the media on Tuesday, blaming it for spreading negativity and focusing too much on “phony scandals” rather than on the progress of the United States. Speaking at the Democratic National Committee in New York City on Tuesday, Obama argued that the press was counteracting his mission and spreading “cynicism”. (via Huffington Post)

‘It Has Been Surreal’ to Cover Ebola in Dallas

On Wednesday, Dr. Seema Yasmin reported on a story she never thought she’d tell in Dallas — Thomas Eric Duncan had died from Ebola. Monday morning, around 11:30, she got a text from a source. The CDC was sending a team to Dallas. As someone who had worked at the CDC until June, she knew they’d only send people out if it really was Ebola. (via Poynter)

New BBC Trust Chair Vows to Defend Organisation’s Independence

Rona Fairhead has started work as chair of the BBC Trust, sending an email to staff vowing to defend its independence and to act on behalf of licence fee payers rather than BBC insiders. In an enthusiastic email that stressed the importance of the BBC to her life, the corporation’s first female chair nevertheless pointed out the challenges ahead, including cost cutting and sorting out the mistakes of the past. (via The Guardian)

OfCom Ruling: Sky News Reporter Going Through Plane Crash Victims’ Luggage Caused ‘Considerable Offence’

UK broadcast regulator OfCom ruled against Sky News’s Colin Brazier for potentially “causing considerable offence” when he riffled through the wreckage of Malaysian Airlines’ MH17, which crashed in Ukraine in July. OfCom received 205 complaints over the report. Brazier went through a suitcase and picked up items among the rubble. In the middle of the live clip, Brazier remarked, “We shouldn’t really be doing this, I suppose.” (via iMediaEthics)

Clarification

Concerns have been raised over the link in our last newsletter to articles from iMediaethics concerning Aljazeera in Egypt. The suggestion is that these articles fail to express clearly the injustice of the jailing of journalists in Cairo. We wish to make it clear that the EJN has consistently sought the release of jailed journalists and we have met with Egyptian government officials to seek their release. We do not always agree with the content of links that we make, but we include material that we hope adds to discussions and debates about journalism. In this case there are elements of a controversy which is deeply felt on all sides; what is not in question is that the journalists of Aljazeera and others currently languishing in prison for doing their jobs should never have been put on trial in the first place and should be released forthwith. – Aidan White