Ethical Journalism Newsletter: May 19th, 2015

 

News and Debates

Tips and advice for fact-checking

How can you know when public figures tell the truth and when they distort it? How can you decide what claims are fair and who to trust? This checklist provides a method for journalists to verify their information (via Africa Check)

5 tips for reviewing health news stories

Reporting on science has always been a challenge for journalists and this is certainly true when it comes to the medical field. Here are 5 tips journalists can use to evaluating the quality of health news stories. (via iMediaEthics)

‘She’s not annoyed, she’s just busy,’ and other advice for finding mentors and role models in journalism

CNET.com’s Editor-in-Chief Lindsey Turrentine shares ways women professionals can seek out mentors and strive for greater diversity in the newsroom. (via Poynter)

We need more diverse voices in the media – including those from deprived backgrounds

Along with women, people from minorities and those with disabilities, we also need to hear from those who have suffered social deprivation. (via The Guardian)

IPSO tells Sunday Express page 30 correction for front-page mistake is not good enough

The Sunday Express has been ordered to publish a page two correction following an inaccurate front-page story. (via Press Gazette)

Reports & Resources

Islam for Journalists

Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute

This free e-book presents the work of top academic experts on Islam in a form accessible to working journalists, along with essays from reporters from The New York Times, the Tennessean and various other news organizations who have covered many local stories involving Muslims in the U.S.

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Drawing The Line: Cartoonists Under Threat

Committee to Protect Journalists

On January 7, two gunmen burst into the offices of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing eight journalists and bringing into focus the risks cartoonists face. But with the ability of their work to transcend borders and languages, and to simplify complex political situations, the threats faced by cartoonists around the world—who are being imprisoned, forced into hiding, threatened with legal action or killed—far exceed Islamic extremism.

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