Ethical Journalism Newsletter: March 20, 2015

 

Ethical Journalism News And Debates

Video: Corruption, ethics and transparency in journalism

EJN Board Members discuss the key problems which lead to unethical journalism practices in today’s newsrooms such as the conflicts of interests in giving gifts, management issues in implementing codes of ethics and the blurred line in advertising and editorials. Watch the video here.

Journalism for sale: can media overcome the corruption now threatening the newsroom?

The conflict of interest between advertiser power and journalism revealed last month by Peter Oborne, who walked out of Britain’s Daily Telegraph accusing the management of censoring stories about HSBC bank and tax evasion, is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to corruption inside media. (via Open Democracy)

Journalists must see beyond religion to understand people’s actions

Knowledge of religion, as with all knowledge, was of value. But what was of overriding importance was to grasp that there were deeper, political reasons for people taking outrageous actions that only appear to stem from religion. (via The Guardian)

Cyber security for journalists: The internet is a hostile environment too

Being a journalist in 2015 is more dangerous than it ever was. In addition to the growing number of threats, attacks, murders and war casualties, we are now being actively targeted online by intelligence agencies, law enforcement and others. Here are suggestions on how to stay off the radar to protect both yourself and your sources. (via The BBC)

Everyone who shares information should take ethical responsibility for it

Why do journalism ethics only apply to those who wear the journalist label when so many others now slide into the journalist role? Information is coming from everywhere, but only a fraction of sources feel pressure to get it right. We need a new way of looking at media ethics. One where ethics follow not people, but impact. (via Columbia Journalism Review)

Reports & Resources

Time to Act Over the Corruption That is Killing Ethical Journalism

This EJN report finds that in countries both rich and poor, there are ‘dark arts’ at work in newsrooms: media managers are doing deals with advertisers to carry paid-for material disguised as honest news; reporters and editors accept bribes and irregular payments; and a culture of dependence on political and corporate friends makes it increasingly difficult to separate journalism from propaganda and impartial reporting from public relations. Unless media professionals at all levels face up to the crisis the future of journalism as a public good which speaks truth to power is at risk.

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