Ethical Journalism Newsletter: August 25, 2015

 

Ethical News And Debates

July was the hottest month ever; cable news barely noticed

Last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued a dire report about the state of the planet: July 2015 was the earth’s warmest month on record, dating back to 1880. Yet from the morning of August 20 through Sunday evening, the fact that the month we had just endured was the hottest on record was mentioned on major cable news networks all of 10 times. During that same period, the name “Donald Trump” was mentioned more than 245 times on MSNBC, more than 265 times on CNN and more than 240 times on Fox News. (Read more on The Huffington Post)

The end of American Journalism Review and what it means for media criticism

Analyzing, reporting, and critiquing the media is a big job, and it is hard to swallow the idea that the media itself can or will do it well or completely enough, even supplemented by independents. (Read more on Columbia Journalism Review)

Arguing that politicians’ tweets shouldn’t be “irrevocable,” Twitter shuts down Politwoops worldwide

When Twitter shut down the U.S. version of Politwoops, a site that archived American politicians’ deleted tweets, in June, it seemed likely that the 30 other such sites worldwide would eventually get the ax as well. Now that has happened: Over the weekend, the Open State Foundation, which ran the non-U.S. versions of Politwoops and Diplotwoops, reported that Twitter has suspended API access for all of those accounts as well. (Read more on Nieman Lab)

Pakistani government mandates guidelines for broadcasters

“Codes of conduct should be voluntarily developed and enforced by a country’s media industry, rather than being handed down by any government,” said Bob Dietz, CPJ’s Asia program coordinator. “Pakistan’s news organizations have shown willingness in the past to develop their own rules for responsible coverage, and this code smacks of government interference and a threat to press freedom in an already frail media environment.” (Read more on Committee to Protect Journalists)

NPR news chief condemns Pentagon guidelines governing treatment of journalists

Michael Oreskes, the senior vice president for news and editorial director at NPR, has drafted a letter objecting to guidelines regarding the treatment of journalists in the Pentagon’s new Law of War manual, calling its guidance “contrary to some basic principles of journalism ethics.” (Read more on Poynter)

Jeremy Corbyn: media diversity ‘is intrinsic to a democratic society’

Diversity in media is something that is intrinsic to a democratic society. We do not want the whole media owned by one person. (Read more on The Guardian)

Applications

Thomson Foundation Young Journalist from the Developing World FPA Award, 2015

Young journalists working in the developing world are invited to enter a Thomson Foundation competition, which will form part of the 2015 UK Foreign Press Association (FPA) Awards. The winner will be chosen from three finalists who will each be flown to London, spend two nights in the city and attend the gala award nightat the Sheraton Park Hotel on 24 November 2015. They will join a host of other potential award winners and leading figures from the world of journalism.

Journalists must meet the following criteria in order to enter the award:

  • Entrants must be aged 30 or under on 24 November 2015;
  • They must be working in countries defined as “developing”, specifically with a Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita of less than $20,000 to enter their work;
  • They must have a portfolio of three published or broadcast pieces of work produced in the 12 months preceding the deadline for submissions.

The deadline for entries is 23.59 GMT Friday, August 28 2015. Apply on the Thomson Foundation website.