Ethical Journalism Network Newsletter – 28 July 2016

NEWS

LE MONDE AND LA CROIX WILL NO LONGER USE IMAGES OF TERRORIST KILLERS, WHILE EUROPE 1 RADIO WILL NOT BROADCAST THEIR NAMES.

Several French news organisations have said they will no longer publish photographs of people responsible for terrorist killings, to avoid bestowing “posthumous glorification”. Le Monde published an editorial after the latest attack, the murder of an elderly priest in a church near Rouen by two men claiming allegiance to Islamic State. Under the headline “Resisting the strategy of hate”, Le Monde argued on Wednesday that all elements of society had to be involved in the struggle against terrorism, and that media organisations had a special role to play.

Read the full article here. (Guardian)

French daily Le Monde to stop publishing pictures of terrorists in order to avoid ‘glorifying them in death’ (Press Gazette)

Résister à la stratégie de la haine (Le Monde)

EXPERT CALLS FOR TERROR ATTACKS TO BE TREATED SAME WAY AS SUICIDE WHEN IT COMES TO MEDIA COVERAGE

Media should treat terrorist attacks the same way as suicide when it comes to reporting in order to reduce the threat of copycat attempts, a leading expert has warned.

Read the full article here. (news.com.au)

WE DON’T CENSOR, SAYS SERBIAN GOVERNMENT, BUT DON’T BELIEVE THE LIES

“See, there is no censorship in Serbia!”

That was supposed to be the message of an exhibition that opened last week in Belgrade.

An exhibition in a gallery in the Serbian capital’s downtown displayed 2,500 items from the local press and social networks, including editorials, front-page articles, and tweets critical of Prime Minister Aleksandar Vucic. Articles and cartoons from the website of RFE/RL’s Balkan Service are among the exhibited items.

The reason? The communications department of the ruling Serbian Progressive Party (SNS) have said that the media is constantly crying foul over government censorship. With this exhibition, the party wanted to prove the opposite — and show that Serbia is a shining beacon of press freedom. Yet the title of the exhibition, Uncensored Lies, makes sure to label all of its content — all critical coverage of the prime minister — as lies.

Read the full article here. (Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty)

IT’S NOT WHO YOU KNOW

The story in the NI on Friday, “SCC judges see many familiar faces,” sounded all too familiar.

In this small community, local judges explained, they often have to recuse themselves when they have a defendant who is standing trial in their court whom they have defended during stints as lawyers in private practice or otherwise have come to know.

The Nogales International does not have that option. Staff regularly comes across people we know or have known as friends and even family when covering the news. Occasionally we are asked not to write stories about crimes that have been committed or print the names of these people as a favor. We don’t grant those favors.

Read the full article here. (Nogales International)

STORY BEHIND A STORY THAT RAISES QUESTIONS ABOUT JOURNALISTIC ETHICS

Stories behind controversial newspaper stories can offer valuable insights into why “the press” is so often criticised for its content and its methodology. What follows is a case in point.

If I was to write a straightforward, factual news report about the matter, it would begin like this:

“A journalist working for the Irish edition of the Mail on Sunday agreed to leave the newspaper after an internal inquiry into her reporting of a tragedy. But Alison O’Reilly’s move to the sister title, the Irish Daily Mail, led to a revolt by staff working for its features department. They refused to work with her and she has since been assigned to the news desk.”

Those two paragraphs conceal an extraordinary sequence of events that followed an understandable public controversy over the Irish Mail on Sunday’s publication of an article written by O’Reilly in the wake of a tragic accident.

It would be easy to cast her as the villain of the piece. But the more I unravelled the details of the incident I came to realise that it amounts to a modern media parable in which she can also be seen as a victim.

Read the full article here. (Guardian)

TACKLING INCLUSIVITY IN NEWSROOMS

As news coverage increasingly focuses on race, immigration and LGBT issues, it’s vital to improve the diversity and perspective of staff, sources and expert commentators.

Read the full article here. (ONA)

U.N. BODY OVERTURNS REJECTION, ACCREDITS #PRESSFREEDOM WATCHDOG

The New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) was granted consultative status at the United Nations on Monday after the U.N. Economic and Social Council overturned an earlier decision rejecting the press freedom watchdog’s application.

Read the full article here. (Reuters)

RESOURCES AND SAFETY TIPS FOR JOURNALISTS COVERING POLITICAL CONVENTIONS

The 2016 U.S. presidential campaign has sparked a volatile political climate across the country. As a result, American media organizations have been providing reporters covering the two national political conventions with special safety training just as they do for those they send to war zones.

Read the full article here. (IJNET)

How TV Networks Can Force Trump to Release His Tax Returns

Since tough questioning has failed to hold the candidate accountable, broadcast outlets need to apply pressure where it counts—to Trump’s ego.

Read the full article here. (The Atlantic)

DRAMATIC PHOTOS SHOW EU MIGRANT CRISIS SCENES IN THE BALKANS IN 2015 AND 2016

Last summer, newspapers and websites around the world were flooded with dramatic photos of huge crowds of migrants and refugees moving across central Europe. In 2015, more than 1.5 million people made irregular border crossings into Europe, mostly to Greece before marching north-west across the Balkans to Germany and Sweden, fleeing war and poverty in the Middle East, North Africa and elsewhere.

A year later, the picture is very different. The crowds have gone, the flow of refugees appears to have dried up. However, although far fewer people are crossing from Greece into western Europe via the Balkans, many more are attempting the far more dangerous crossing from Libya to Italy.

Getty Images photojournalist Matt Cardy returned to many of last year’s migrant crisis hotspots in Serbia, Croatia, Slovenia and Hungary. Compare and contrast the scenes in 2015 and 2016 by moving your mouse across each image.

Read the full article here. (International Business Times)

For more on media and migration in the Balkans read our Moving Stories report, especially the chapter on Bulgaria – A study in media sensationalism.

Press Release | Foreword | Introduction | Recommendations

MATERIALS

VERIFICATION HANDBOOK FOR INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING HAS BEEN RELEASED IN ARABIC

الفصل الأول: فُرَص استخدام المعلومات المتاحة للجمهور، والمحتوى الذي ينتجه المُسْتَخْدِمون في العمل الاستقصائي

Download the handbook here.

“Getting the facts right is a cardinal principle of journalism but media struggle to be ethical when a big story is breaking. This handbook helps news makers keep faith with truth-telling – even when online speculation is rampant.”
Aidan White, Director, The Ethical Journalism Network (EJN)

The handbook is already available in the following languages.

Available in Greek! (PDF, ePub or Kindle)
Available in French! (PDF, ePub or Kindle)
Available in Portuguese (PDF, ePub or Kindle)
Available in Spanish (PDF, ePub or Kindle)
Available in Arabic (العربية)!
Тепер також і на українській мові! (PDF, ePub or Kindle) Now also available in Turkish (PDF, ePub or Kindle)
Now also available in Croatian (PDF, ePub or Kindle)
Now also available in Italian (PDF)

ACTIVITIES

OSLO MEDIA MEETING – 2016

On September 1st, our friends at the Oslo Media House are hosting a can event event with several top names from the international media business coming to Oslo, to share their experiences:

Dale Herigstad got his first (of four) Emmy-awards making Tom Cruise look smart in Minority Report. He also worked with Microsoft on the first surface board. More recently, Dale co-founded SeeSpace, whose first product, InAiR, places dynamic IP content in the space in front of the Television, perhaps the first Augmented Television experience. And Dale is now researching and developing the design methodology for navigating virtual information for AR and VR, with a recent focus on AVR (augmented virtual reality).

Louise Roug is the former Global News Editor of Mashable and Foreign Editor of Newsweek. She now works with Politico and wil give us exciting details from the US election campaign.
Jessikka Aro has revealed how Vladimir Putin and Russian authorities supports “troll-factories” that works around the clock to harass people in social media and media in general. Jessikka is now their enemy number one.
Alexios Mantzarlis from Poynter Institute works with automation of fact check. You’ll soon be able to get articles or videos fact checked on the fly.
Sevgi Akarçeşmewas a fearless and critical editor of Turkish Zaman Today, until authorities took control of the newspaper. Now she is on the run from Turkey. She is a living example on the struggle for free journalism in Europe.

Some of the most hot topics in media development will be issued:

  • 360 video journalism, visiting the ruins rubble of Aleppo
  • Robot journalism, how soccer coverage has been revolutionized this summer
  • Making users paying customers. Some publisher succeeds in getting readers to pay the stuff

Click here to attend. The program starts at 1pm and ends at 6pm.