Ethical Journalism Network Newsletter – 18 August 2016

NEWS

SOUTH KOREAN JOURNALISTS REPORTING TIRADE BREACH OFF-THE-RECORD TRADITION

Whether “off the record” means not for attribution, or not publishable at all, has been a longstanding debate. But it always means the source should be able to trust the reporter to be discreet. Off-the-record meetings have their uses. Since not everyone is in a position to talk to the press, sometimes it’s the best, even if an imperfect, channel for opening a trail to better information—which could lead to scoops or insights later. Dishonor your agreement, and not only will sources avoid you, but other journalists could have a harder time getting access because of you. […] Our relationship with the people we cover sometimes needs an element of hostility and antagonism; sometimes, they need us as much as we need them, and it can be more ethical to burn our access than to bow too hastily to the terms dictated to us.

Read the full article here. (CJR)

WHAT EVERY JOURNALIST SHOULD KNOW ABOUT ANONYMOUS SOURCES

During a workshop in South Sudan last year, reporters voiced concern that some media organizations were using anonymous sources to further personal agendas and attack political enemies. There was a consensus that accurate, fair and reliable reporting was being undermined and that reader trust was at stake in the fledgling democracy steeped in political conflict.

Read the full article here. (IJNET)

EYES OF THE AFGHAN GIRL: A CRITICAL TAKE ON THE ‘STEVE MCCURRY SCANDAL’

I will begin by saying that my intention is not to attack Steve McCurry or defame him in any manner. It is only an attempt to clear certain facts that have come to light regarding his work and to also raise certain questions on aspects that may or may not have been missed, but certainly have not been expressed till now… at least not publicly.

Read the full article here. (PetaPixel)

‘COUNTRIES WITH STRONG PUBLIC SERVICE MEDIA HAVE LESS RIGHTWING EXTREMISM’

Countries that have popular, well-funded public service broadcasters encounter less rightwing extremism and corruption and have more press freedom, a report from the European Broadcasting Union has found. For the first time, an analysis has been done of the contribution of public service media, such as the BBC, to democracy and society. Following Brexit and the rise in rightwing extremism across Europe, the report shows the impact strong publicly funded television and radio has had on voter turnout, control of corruption and press freedom.

Read the full article here. (Guardian)

EBU research shows strong public service media contributes to a healthy democracy. (EBU)

STOP FEEDING THE NEWS MACHINE: TAKE TIME TO PRODUCE QUALITY JOURNALISM

Inspired by the Slow Food Movement, which aims for quality food, produced in a way that doesn’t harm the environment, is accessibly priced, and gives a fair return to its producers, Peter Laufer, an award-winning author, journalist, and broadcaster launched his Slow News Movement – a “healthier approach to journalism,” offering the audience a balanced and nutritious news diet.
Read the full article here. (WAN-IFRA)

EUROPEAN TRUST IN MEDIA: RADIO OUTSHINES SOCIAL NETWORKS

While the overall perception of the trustworthiness of the media has decreased over the last five years, radio still remains the number one trusted source of news for European citizens, according to the European European Broadcasting Union (EBU).

Read the full article here. (WAN-IFRA)

WHILE THE OLYMPICS CONTINUE IN RIO DE JANEIRO, SO DO THE ISSUES IN MEDIA ETHICS REPORTING

More Olympics Reporting Fails: Petition against Daily Beast, Michael Phelps vs. Ryan Lochte, Swimmer ‘Died like a Pig,’ Volleyball Star ‘Looking for a Boyfriend’.

Read the full article here. (iMedia Ethics)

Bad form at the Olympics in Daily Beast’s Grindr-baiting story (LA Times)

JOURNALISTS IN EXILE: GETTING REFUGEE REPORTERS BACK IN THE NEWSROOM

The programme, based in Germany, was set up to pair the journalists with German reporters and provide mentorship and training.

Read the full article here. (Journalism.co.uk)

WHAT TO DO WHEN YOUR BOSS BEHAVES BADLY

The Roger Ailes saga continues, with recent reports that he used Fox resources to investigate various personal enemies, including journalists. What should managers or staffers do if they feel a boss is behaving unethically, from sexually harassing employees to misspending company money?

Read the full interview with Jill Geisler here. (CJR)

DMU AND C4 LAUNCH INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM MA

Channel 4 has teamed up with De Montfort University Leicester (DMU)’s Leicester Media School to launch a new Investigative Journalism MA. This unique MA programme will equip graduates with the journalistic and investigative skills needed for hard-hitting current affairs journalism.

For more information about the course visit the DMU website.

Full disclosure: The head of Channel 4 News and Current Affairs, Dorothy Byrne, is Chair of the EJN board of trustees.

ACTIVITIES

NEW ETHICAL JOURNALISM NEWSLETTER LAUNCHING THIS MONTH

Later this month the Ethical Journalism Network is launching a revamped version of our newsletter.

The Ethical Journalism Bulletin will now be sent once a week on Thursday’s at 1200 GMT.

Our new website will also be launched in the coming weeks. If you have any feedback on the newsletter or ideas for our new website please contact our Director of Communications and Campaigns, Tom Law at tlaw@ethicaljournalismnetwork.org